Borrowing – Fast Paths http://fastpaths.com/ Fri, 28 May 2021 19:10:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://fastpaths.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Borrowing – Fast Paths http://fastpaths.com/ 32 32 How To Work With A Student Loan Ombudsman https://fastpaths.com/how-to-work-with-a-student-loan-ombudsman/ https://fastpaths.com/how-to-work-with-a-student-loan-ombudsman/#respond Wed, 19 May 2021 06:22:56 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/?p=632 Contacting your student loan lender is usually the first step in resolving an issue. But what if it gets you nowhere? Last year, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau received about 5,800 student loan complaints, and 65% of them related to dealing with lenders or loan servicers. Sometimes you need to call in some extra help. […]]]>

Contacting your student loan lender is usually the first step in resolving an issue. But what if it gets you nowhere? Last year, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau received about 5,800 student loan complaints, and 65% of them related to dealing with lenders or loan servicers.

Sometimes you need to call in some extra help. That’s where a student loan ombudsman comes in. Here’s what they do and how they can help you handle your loan issues.

What Is a Student Loan Ombudsman?

At Oak Park Financial a student loan ombudsman is an independent and confidential resource that helps you with student loans and sometimes federal financial aid concerns.

The ombudsman can help you:

• Resolve disputes. If you’re struggling with student loan balances, interest rates and payments or Pell Grant disbursements, you can reach out to the ombudsman for help. They can explain how interest rates and charges work and answer questions about how student loans work.

• Review collections. If you’ve missed payments for long enough, your loan might be in default. If your original loan servicer has sold or assigned your loan to a collections agency, an ombudsman can detail what that means for your repayment plan.

• Explain repayment options. If you’re looking into consolidation, deferment, forbearance, cancellation or discharge, an ombudsman can look over your loans to see what you’re eligible for.

While an ombudsman serves as an informal resource for federal aid and loan help, they shouldn’t be your first stop. The ombudsman should be one of your last stops—after your student loan servicer or lender—when it comes to handling your loans.

Types of Student Loan Ombudsmen

There isn’t one ombudsman that rules them all. There are dozens of different types that exist based on your needs. For instance, there are ombudsmen in banks, hospitals, universities and other agencies. For student loan ombudsmen, you may look into:

• Federal Student Aid. The Federal Student Aid Ombudsman Group handles disputes for federal student aid, including loans and grant programs.

• Private lenders. Many lenders have their own ombudsmen that serve to settle student loan issues. Most banks, credit unions and online lenders should have these departments, but they might not be easily accessible. Do an online search, like “your lender + ombudsman,” to find them.

• State agencies. Some states have their own ombudsperson that serves in a state-level capacity, rather than institutional. Each state classifies them differently, whether it’s within the Department of Consumer Credit Protection or Office of Financial Services. Since there’s no universal state agency that houses the student loan ombudsman, you might need to do a bit of digging. You may also have luck looking into student loan ombudsman services through your state Attorney General’s office.

• Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The CFPB has its own private student loan ombudsman. Through its “Submit a Complaint” service, the CFPB handles both federal and private student loan disputes.

How to Work With an Ombudsman on a Student Loan Complaint

Reaching out to an ombudsman isn’t your first step—it’s usually one of your last. You can expect the process to go something like this:

1. Get Your Records in Order

The ombudsman is going to ask you questions about your account information and dispute. Make sure you have detailed records to share with the ombudsman before you get started. This will save you a lot of time when the process starts. This might also be the point where you realize you’re not ready to reach out to an ombudsperson yet.

2. Keep Detailed Accounts

Take notes of every interaction with your loan servicer, ombudsman or anyone else related to your student loans, including the time, date, customer representative’s name and the nature of your interaction. Good records will only help your case. Make sure your messaging is consistent. If your story changes, you might not get your problem resolved the way you hope to.

3. Complete Necessary Forms

Depending on your needs, each ombudsman might have a different process for filing disputes and complaints. For instance, before you file with the Federal Student Aid Ombudsman Group, there’s a checklist to complete. It outlines your dispute, what you’ve done to resolve the problem, your evidence and any contact you’ve made with your servicer.

This form helps you determine if you’re ready to contact the ombudsman or you need a little more time to work it out with your lender.

4. Stay Updated

If you’ve submitted a complaint or dispute to an ombudsman, they’ll be able to tell you how to work through your issue going forward. Sometimes it gets resolved on a phone call. Sometimes they’ll provide the next steps. Depending on your needs, make sure to stay in communication until the dispute is resolved.

What to Expect When Seeking Outside Help with Student Loan Issues

Reaching out to your lender to problem-solve is a great first step, but that doesn’t mean your issue will get fixed right away, or at all.

An ombudsman is a good neutral resource for fixing your student loan concerns. But that doesn’t mean your concerns will get resolved. Ombudspeople don’t have the capacity to process loan changes or requests for deferment, forbearance or forgiveness. All those are handled through your loan servicer. An ombudsman isn’t your advocate; they don’t work for you. They work for a fair and just process.

But they will help you sort out loan discrepancies and help you find other resources for your student loan problems. While they can’t enroll you in a new repayment plan, they can point you in the right direction of how to make those changes. Sometimes, it may seem like your lender does not have your best interest in mind. Talking with an ombudsman gives you an independent way to figure out your student loan options.

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My boyfriend doesn’t like my kids, and more advice from Dear Prudence. https://fastpaths.com/my-boyfriend-doesnt-like-my-kids-and-more-advice-from-dear-prudence/ https://fastpaths.com/my-boyfriend-doesnt-like-my-kids-and-more-advice-from-dear-prudence/#respond Wed, 19 May 2021 03:52:55 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/?p=488 Dear Prudence is online weekly to chat live with readers. Here’s an edited transcript of this week’s chat. Danny Lavery: More problems in search of a solution today. Let’s chat! Q. My boyfriend doesn’t like my kids: I’m a single mom of two (6 and 8), and my boyfriend of a year and a half opened […]]]>

Dear Prudence is online weekly to chat live with readers. Here’s an edited transcript of this week’s chat.

Danny Lavery: More problems in search of a solution today. Let’s chat!

Q. My boyfriend doesn’t like my kids: I’m a single mom of two (6 and 8), and my boyfriend of a year and a half opened up to me that he thinks I have great kids, but he doesn’t enjoy spending time with them. He’s great with them and does things with us out of love for me. We were about to move in together until he told me this. I’m glad he told me, but now I’m hesitant. Is this normal? If we were to continue, is this a relationship bound for resentment and failure?

A: It may very well be normal to not like someone else’s kids, but I don’t think “normal” is an important framework here. “Is it a good idea to move in with a man who told me he doesn’t like spending time with my kids?” is the question to ask yourself, and it seems pretty clear that the answer is “Hell no.” I’m glad he told you before you moved in together, and I don’t fault him for not liking children, but this should immediately and drastically affect your plans. Don’t move in with him! It will be hard for your kids, because kids are pretty good at intuiting when an adult finds them tolerable at best and doesn’t really want them around. It will be hard for him, living with a couple of kids he doesn’t especially like but who still need to be raised and cared for pretty much 24/7. And it will be hard for you, feeling at odds.

That doesn’t mean you have to break up immediately—or necessarily at all!—or that the time he does spend with your kids is necessarily fraudulent or worthless. Maybe in a few years you’ll be in a different position; maybe you’ll decide this is too serious an incompatibility and end up splitting anyway. But living together is a serious commitment that will affect your kids’ daily lives, and you shouldn’t move ahead with this plan now that you’ve learned this.

How to Get Advice From Prudie:

• Send questions for publication here. (Questions may be edited.)

• Join the live chat Mondays at noon. Submit your questions and comments here before or during the discussion.

• Call the voicemail of the Dear Prudence podcast at 401-371-DEAR (3327) to hear your question answered on a future episode of the show.

Q. Estranged brother wants to un-estrange: Last year, my brother announced to my parents and my sister that he no longer wanted anything to do with any of us. My brother was formally diagnosed with narcissistic personality disorder after years of narcotics and alcohol addiction and a suicide attempt. He said his reason for wanting to cut ties is that he is angry with us for making him quit opioids—he was handling them fine. The date he chose to announce his estrangement was the anniversary of our other brother’s death; he died when he was 10 from cancer, and the date is always a tender one for us. It felt clear he chose the date for maximal pain for our parents. Then, a year later, just this week, he sent us all an email saying that he feels like we don’t love him or care about him at all, and wants us all to do family therapy with him.

I love my brother. I wish him only the best, and I’m really glad that the therapy he has been working through has been helpful. However, I have come to realize that I like being estranged from him. He is mean, manipulative, and the things he did to me, my family, and my kids while in his addiction are not things I’m ready to revisit. I’m worried I might say something unkind and I don’t want to hurt him or cause him any setbacks. I replied to his email saying that I’m happy he is doing well, that I love him and I wish him the best, but I’m not interested in going to therapy with him. He responded saying that if I loved him, I would do what he wants, which is family therapy. This feels like the manipulation I’m used to from him, and I don’t want to respond. Am I being cruel? What’s the best way to protect myself without hurting him?

A: There’s an important distinction to be drawn here, I think, between cruelty and noncompliance. You can take your brother’s feelings seriously without committing to doing whatever he wants you to do on demand. “If you don’t commit to going to family therapy with me after we haven’t spoken in a year, it’s an indicator that you don’t really love me” is not a solid foundation for trying to repair your relationship. Nor does it sound like your brother is ready to hear about how his behavior might have affected you in the past, or to treat therapy as a two-way street.

Saying no to his request might feel painful because you wish it were possible to relieve some of his pain, or to relate to one another differently, but it is not cruel to say “I can’t try to rebuild our relationship under these conditions, where you unilaterally decide when and whether to speak to me, then tell me I don’t really love you unless I agree to therapy right away.” That might feel sad, painful, or like a new kind of loss, but it doesn’t rise to the level of cruelty. You’re choosing not to oblige to your brother’s wants because you believe it would likely lead to further alienation and hostility. That strikes me as both a prudent and painful position to take—but keep in mind that the pain already exists. You’re not creating it by saying no; you’re merely acknowledging it’s already there. Avoiding a path where you’re likely to say something hurtful in anger is a good choice, as is refraining from trying to rebuild a relationship with someone you don’t believe is prepared to maintain their own “side of the street,” so to speak.

None of this means you have to resign yourself to never speaking to your brother again; it’s possible that some day in the future, you might reconnect under different conditions. Nor does it mean you have to choose your pain over his, dismiss his experience wholesale, or think of yourself as solely harmed by him and never having caused pain yourself. But wishing him the best and enjoying your own peaceful existence is not cruel, and I think you’re right not to respond, painful though it may feel.

Q. No good deed: Since the pandemic, we’ve been having more items delivered to our home. I know delivery drivers are subject to difficult working conditions, so I created a treat box filled with water and snacks that I set on our porch. I also left a couple cash tips around Christmas when we got a lot of deliveries, some very heavy. We’ve received a couple thank-you notes from drivers, and they use the treat box frequently.

However, our recent meal-service delivery driver wrote “My birthday is 4/24. Happy Saturday! Thanks for the treats.” I feel he’s put us in a very awkward position. If I provide a gift, then I’ll be setting an expectation for other drivers to receive the same. If I do nothing or decline his request, then I fear that I may suddenly start losing packages or receiving damaged items. The note was written on the box in Sharpie, so I can’t pretend I just didn’t see it either. What’s my best course of action here?

A: I think it’s a stretch to assume your driver is going to start “losing” your packages (which would probably jeopardize his own job) if you don’t buy him a birthday present. Everyone who’s participated in your informal arrangement seems to have behaved appropriately for the past year, so you have good reason to think they’ll continue doing so, even if all you do is say “happy birthday” should you happen to run into that particular delivery driver on the 24th.

If you would like to leave something special for him that day, it doesn’t have to be an elaborate gift, nor do you have to commit to buying birthday presents for everyone who drops a package on your front doorstep. It’s a little strange that he left you a note about his birthday, but it doesn’t place you under a new obligation, and I don’t think you need to take it as a threat. Based on the dynamic you’ve described here, it seems likelier that he simply appreciates your consideration and wants to occasionally leave a friendly note of his own.

Q. Expiration date: I’m currently in the second romantic relationship of my life, and like my first relationship, it has a mutually agreed-upon expiration date. This isn’t due to dysfunction or self-sabotage, but rather a combination of me being something of a planner and the many life changes in one’s early 20s. The arrangement is working really well for both of us—it allows us to treasure the time we have together without making any ill-fated long-term commitments.

However, I’ve noticed that people who aren’t in this relationship get really upset about the idea of expiration dates. It feels like every time I’ve brought it up, people are quick to start suggesting scenarios in which my partner and I don’t have to break up and instead live happily ever after together. I find this really frustrating! Is there anything I can say to assure people this isn’t a tragedy and make them more comfortable with the idea that I can be happy in a relationship that I know won’t last forever?

A: I can appreciate why your friends might feel slightly at a loss, since it’s a little unusual to announce “My partner and I are very happy together, and we’ll be breaking up on Labor Day 2023.” To that end, if you’re bringing it up often or repeatedly, especially to people whose input you’re not interested in hearing, I think it might be best to drop the topic for now and treat it as a “need-to-know” conversation. When you two do eventually break up, and your friends need to know about it, you can discuss it in greater detail then. That doesn’t mean you have to keep completely silent on the subject, of course, nor that you should apologize for having brought it up in the first place, just that it’s probably the easiest way to avoid further discussion. Beyond that, if you want to simultaneously reassure and preempt your friends, go with something like this: “I realize this might sound a little unusual, but we both feel really good about this, and don’t see it as a problem to be solved. I don’t want any suggestions about how we might avoid breaking up in the future, so I’d appreciate it if you stopped offering them.”

Q. Is my boyfriend still in love with his ex? I’ve been with my boyfriend for about two years and things are pretty good. One of the things that has always bothered me, though, is his relationship with his ex-girlfriend. They are like best friends and message each other multiple times a day, every single day. I’m friends with all my exes, so I like that they have a good relationship, but sometimes it seems that they would be better off together. They have way more things in common and “get” each other. I get lost (and bored …) sometimes when he talks about things he’s really into, but I know she’s into the same things and would love to be involved in those conversations. When they got together, they moved way too fast and moved in together almost immediately, and they were both going through depressions and didn’t have a good relationship. But they’ve both changed and grown since then (about three years ago), and maybe if they got together this time, things would be different or better? When I’ve brought this up (in a genuinely curious, not accusatory or insecure, way), my boyfriend insists that they’re not interested in each other that way anymore. But seriously, this guy would drop everything and do pretty much anything she asked him to at any time. His behavior toward me also changes when she’s around. He’s more accommodating to her feelings than mine, and I’ve felt left out sometimes and more like a friend than a girlfriend.

I love the man but I’m not really in love with him. It’s been more of a companionate (yet very fun!) relationship, but I truly think they would be a much better match and think he’s just not being honest with himself or me. I’m wondering if I should ask his best guy friend, who is also really good friends with this woman, if he thinks they’re delaying the inevitable and are meant to be together. What do you think I should do?

A: I think you should probably break up with your boyfriend! I’m not sure what information you might be able to wrest from your boyfriend’s best guy friend that you don’t already have, especially since you’d just be asking for his subjective impression of what he thinks might happen in the future. The salient point in your letter is not whether your boyfriend might ever formally get back together with his ex, but that you’re “not really in love with him.” You also tend to get bored when he talks about his interests and you’re uncomfortable with the way he prioritizes his relationship with his erstwhile ex. Those are excellent reasons to pursue an amicable, friendly breakup, and you don’t need to make sure he “admits” to himself that he really wants to be with her in order for you to move on. Maybe he will end up dating her again someday! Maybe he simply wants to be close friends with her, and his next girlfriend will be fine with their relationship; maybe his next girlfriend will find their relationship irritating and will decide to break up with him over it. Let whoever that next girlfriend may be solve her own problems. You just have to worry about yours. You have sufficient reason to end this relationship right now, not in a fit of pique or because you think he’s a bad person, but because you’ve reached the end of the road and spend a lot of time thinking how much better off he’d be dating someone who isn’t you.

Q. How do I get my parents to recognize my needs? I’m 33, formally unemployed, and living at home for the past four years since I lost my job. I was a history and English teacher until I decided it was no longer financially a good idea, and decided not to pursue it after my contract was non-renewed. I am looking at a career change into something more financially rewarding, and I have started an online 1920s–1970s vintage clothing business. I am responsible for every part of the business, and it is a lot to strategize, plan, and get done.

I am grateful to be able to live at home while I do this, but my parents don’t seem to understand that I have obligations and financial needs. They constantly demand that I do things for them at the last minute, and get angry if I don’t. These are the types of things they could easily ask somebody else to help out with, yet they don’t appear to be making any real effort to do so. Attempts at setting boundaries have led to them verbally attacking me. The kicker is I have a brother who has been living at home since he was 18, and is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars in Bitcoins. But he simply does not seem to get the same verbal attacks when he refuses to do things.

A: The double standard between you and your brother sounds genuinely frustrating, and I don’t wonder that you chafe at your parents’ habit of not discussing their expectations in advance, instead frequently making last-minute requests and getting upset when you’re working on something of your own. But you have relatively little leverage in this situation, and I think your best strategy in the long run will be moving out and getting a place of your own.

To that end, you say that you’ve started an online vintage clothing business in the hopes that it would be more financially rewarding than teaching, but you don’t say whether you’re anywhere near being able to live independently and support yourself on the strength of that income. It’s not clear whether you’ve been working on this business for the last four years or whether it’s a more recent venture, but if it’s not getting you close to being able to schedule a move-out date, it might be time to look for work that will get you there, so you don’t have to spend the next four years in a similar position.

In the meantime, since you won’t be able to move out next week even if you managed to score a full-time job tomorrow, look for ways to make things as easy as possible for yourself. Yes, your brother gets away with things that you can’t—but it seems unlikely that you’re going to be able to convince your parents to start treating him differently after years or even decades, so focus your energy on husbanding your own time rather than trying to intervene in how your parents treat him. If even simple requests like “Can we set aside some time on Sunday to talk about what you need help with this week? That will help me arrange my own work schedule so I’m available when you need me” are met with verbal attacks, it might be that these frequent interruptions are the rent your parents are charging you instead of money. Sometimes paying money ends up being easier in the long run, so at that point, you might want to prioritize finding a job with more reliable income and put your vintage clothing business on hold, or at least demote it to a side gig until you’re in a better place.

Q. Skipping out on a bachelorette weekend: A friend of mine is getting married this fall and asked me to be a bridesmaid. I was ecstatic. I love weddings and I know hers is going to be fun. I got laid off a couple months ago and am having trouble getting approved for unemployment. Money is tight, and I may have to borrow money from my mother to be in the wedding. I’m fine with that—weddings are one of the few things I am willing to spend money on because I love them so much. Normally, I wouldn’t borrow money for something like this, but after this year, I’m willing to do so.

The only problem is, the bride wants a bachelorette weekend on a lake instead of a pub crawl because of COVID. I don’t think I can afford this. What’s more, I really just don’t want to go. I have health issues that leave me tired for most of the day, and I don’t have the energy to do all the activities she wants. Is it appropriate to not do the weekend? I could maybe spend one of the afternoons or evenings there, but I just don’t think I can financially swing an entire weekend.

A: Of course it’s appropriate! Agreeing to be a bridesmaid does not mean you just signed a contract to take out loans on vacations you can’t afford. If a bride wants to go above and beyond the traditional bachelorette party evening and turn it into a full weekend or longer trip, that’s lovely—but she must also be flexible and understanding if not everyone in her bridal party has the time or money to do the same. Just tell her it’s not in your budget. Only offer to come out for one evening if you really think you can do so without coming up short on rent, and have a great time at the wedding.

Q. Re: My boyfriend doesn’t like my kids: Your kids do not deserve this and do not have a say. Don’t push this onto them, please.

A: I think that’s the right perspective here. Moving in with a partner when your kids are that young is a big commitment! If the balance is working right now, where he sees them on occasion and can muster up the energy to be warm/friendly/attentive, then by all means keep seeing each other. But living with kids that young is such an investment in their care and upbringing, and I just don’t think it would be good for them. It probably wouldn’t be much fun for the adults either, but that’s secondary.

Q. Re: Estranged brother wants to un-estrange: Therapist here. I think some way of coming to terms with his destructive behavior (both personally and to his/your family of origin) would be helpful for all of you, but I wouldn’t go to family therapy without a clear indication that he is in individual therapy, has been for a while, and this is something that his therapist thinks is a good idea. The way he chose to announce his estrangement was unnecessarily cruel, and in addition to all of the other work he has to do to acknowledge his responsibility in all of this, he needs to reassure everyone that any shared therapy would not just be a venue for him to continue to be cruel and destructive.

A: I think that’s useful, and I also think that it would still be fine for the letter writer to decide they’d rather have a peaceful distance from their brother, even if he was able to provide that reassurance. But I agree that reappearing after a year and demanding everyone “prove” their love by going to therapy with him right off the bat does not bode well.

Discuss this column on our Facebook page!

Classic Prudie

Q. Complicated family issues: My husband was estranged from his parents for many years. He reached out to them when he was diagnosed with a terminal illness. They didn’t have enough time to discuss and resolve their past, but they were at peace with each other when he died. Now my husband’s parents wish to keep in touch with me and my toddler-age son, as he is the only link they have to their only child.

The problem is that my son is not my husband’s biological child. I had an affair, the biological father dumped me upon realizing I was pregnant, and my husband (to cut the complicated story short) decided to raise the baby as his own. He didn’t legally adopt our son—we simply put his name on the birth certificate and that was that—or tell anybody other than our marriage therapist. It was a painful, regretful, and humiliating episode of my life and I do not wish to tell even my own parents. But I feel incredibly guilty whenever my in-laws talk to me about how grateful they are to have a grandchild to remember their son, or make comparisons between my son and my husband when he was at a similar age. I feel like I need to come clean with them before they develop a strong attachment to him. They are already talking about changing their will to include their “grandson.” What should I do?

Now available in your podcast player: the audiobook edition of Danny M. Lavery’s latest book, Something That May Shock and Discredit YouGet it from Slate. 

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This spacious contemporary home in Dauphin County features a heated pool, hot tub and wet bar: Cool Spaces https://fastpaths.com/this-spacious-contemporary-home-in-dauphin-county-features-a-heated-pool-hot-tub-and-wet-bar-cool-spaces/ https://fastpaths.com/this-spacious-contemporary-home-in-dauphin-county-features-a-heated-pool-hot-tub-and-wet-bar-cool-spaces/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:16:32 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/this-spacious-contemporary-home-in-dauphin-county-features-a-heated-pool-hot-tub-and-wet-bar-cool-spaces/ This contemporary home sits on a private road on 10 acre wooded land in Middle Paxton Township, Dauphin County. Just minutes from the Harrisburg Country Club and Fort Hunter, the location is a 15-minute drive to the town of Harrisburg. The home features a fenced back yard with a deck – fully accessible from three […]]]>

This contemporary home sits on a private road on 10 acre wooded land in Middle Paxton Township, Dauphin County.

Just minutes from the Harrisburg Country Club and Fort Hunter, the location is a 15-minute drive to the town of Harrisburg.

The home features a fenced back yard with a deck – fully accessible from three different sets of French doors on the first floor – leading out to the heated inground pool and a fully landscaped lower level. It is ideal for entertaining.

Outside, the lower level is a hot tub, while inside is a wet bar, surround sound, full bathroom, and pool table.

The home offers a total of 4,600 square feet of living space and is a spectacular entrance with a two story cathedral ceiling entrance hall and custom curved staircase.

The first floor also has an office space as well as a living room with ceiling tray, parquet floor and gas fireplace. A formal dining room also has a lighted tray ceiling and wood floors, while a large kitchen opens to a family room with a wood burning fireplace.

The master suite features a lighted shelf ceiling, French doors that open onto a rear balcony, a stone gas fireplace and a large bathroom with a tub and large walk-in closet.

Located at 481 Toms Road in the Township of Middle Paxton, the house, currently for sale, was listed at $ 610,000 by Agent Krystle Bobb with Iron Valley Real Estate of Central PA.

Want more cool spaces? See all of our stories showcasing Pennsylvania’s finest homes, businesses, and museums by Click here. Do you know any cool spaces? Submit your ideas to dgleiter@pennlive.com.

Read more:

170-year-old farmhouse in Dauphin County rebuilt to its ‘original glory’: Cool Spaces

PennLive’s best of Cool Spaces of 2020: Must-see homes in central Pennsylvania.

York County Farmhouse features reclaimed lumber, modern kitchen, horse barn, over 10 acres: Cool Spaces

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Whatcom Unified Command COVID-19 Response in Numbers https://fastpaths.com/whatcom-unified-command-covid-19-response-in-numbers/ https://fastpaths.com/whatcom-unified-command-covid-19-response-in-numbers/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:16:11 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/whatcom-unified-command-covid-19-response-in-numbers/ Proposed by Whatcom Unified Command In March, Whatcom Unified Command (WUC) has been activated to provide an integrated, coordinated and multi-jurisdictional response to the threat of COVID-19 at the local level, in partnership with the Whatcom County Health Department. Over the past five months, the numbers have made a difference in the joint effort to […]]]>

Proposed by Whatcom Unified Command

In March, Whatcom Unified Command (WUC) has been activated to provide an integrated, coordinated and multi-jurisdictional response to the threat of COVID-19 at the local level, in partnership with the Whatcom County Health Department. Over the past five months, the numbers have made a difference in the joint effort to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

The number of people and agencies working, the volume of supplies received and distributed, and the breadth of agencies and people served are unprecedented in recent memory.

Since the pandemic reached Whatcom County, WUC has called on professionals on loan from their home agencies as well as volunteers to implement goals based on WUC’s priorities: personal safety; continuity of government; essential social services; and economic impacts. In support of these goals, WUC established and maintains an isolation and quarantine facility, provides delivery and support services to food banks in the region, supported the initial relocation of the reception center and planned and staffed a four-day low barrier with drive-thru COVID-19 Pilot Testing Program with the Whatcom County Health Department.

“Having Whatcom Unified Command as a partner is vital for the community’s practical response to this public health threat,” said Erika Lautenbach, director of the Whatcom County Health Department. “WUC not only supports the direct public health response through its partnerships in planning and operational efforts related to testing, PPE distribution, and isolation and quarantine facilities, but also carried out the logistical work. which is essential to meet some of the basic needs of our community. such as childcare and food distribution. ”

Trial:
The pilot test project, which laid the groundwork for additional on-demand testing, was made possible by more than 65 staff and volunteers from the Department of Health and WUC, working 328 teams over four days. During this period, more than 1,800 tests were administered, with 19 confirmed cases identified. Additional low barrier testing will be offered at the site around Whatcom County, starting later this month.

Byron Avenue isolation and quarantine:
Since the establishment of Byron Avenue was established in late April, more than 80 people have been able to safely quarantine themselves for up to 14 days after exposure to a person with a confirmed case of COVID-19, or staying isolated during illness, for a total of 545 bed days.

Food support services:
Every week, WUC and volunteers from the Civil Air Patrol (CAP), YMCA, Whatcom Transportation Authority (WTA), Whatcom County Search and Rescue and community food bank partners distribute food to hundreds of people. households. In just one month (June), WUC and its partners distributed around 900,000 meals.

Volunteers:
Without volunteers, the essential work of WUC could not take place. In four months (between March and July), approximately 200 volunteers contributed over 8,000 hours and 10,000 miles.

Distribution:
WUC has provided Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to 148 agencies across Whatcom County. The PPE distributed includes over 200,000 gloves, nearly 140 gallons of hand sanitizer, over 305,000 disposable masks and nearly 160,000 sheet masks. (Masks, along with hand washing and social distancing, remain the most effective proven way to reduce the spread of COVID-19.)

The numbers that motivate everyone else:
In the past two weeks, between July 28 and August 10, the number of confirmed cases increased by 136, bringing the Whatcom County total to 989, with 39 local lives lost. Although the focus is on the number six (the number of feet of separation in “social distancing”) and the number of metrics encountered that are essential to move to phase 3, the Department of Health notes “the most important number to watchIs even more personal. This is the number of people that each person gathers with.

For more information on community resources or the work of Whatcom Unified Command, please see WhatcomCOVID.com or the Whatcom COVID-19 Facebook Unified Command page.

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Floating gardens as a way of continuing to cultivate despite climate change https://fastpaths.com/floating-gardens-as-a-way-of-continuing-to-cultivate-despite-climate-change/ https://fastpaths.com/floating-gardens-as-a-way-of-continuing-to-cultivate-despite-climate-change/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:15:54 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/floating-gardens-as-a-way-of-continuing-to-cultivate-despite-climate-change/ COLUMBUS, Ohio – Bangladesh’s floating gardens, built to produce food during flood seasons, could offer a sustainable solution for areas of the world prone to flooding due to climate change, according to a new study. The study, published recently in the Agriculture, Food and Environment Journal, suggests that floating gardens could not only help reduce […]]]>

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Bangladesh’s floating gardens, built to produce food during flood seasons, could offer a sustainable solution for areas of the world prone to flooding due to climate change, according to a new study.

The study, published recently in the Agriculture, Food and Environment Journal, suggests that floating gardens could not only help reduce food insecurity, but could also provide income to rural households in flood-prone areas of Bangladesh.

“We are focusing here on adaptive change for people who are victims of climate change, but who have not caused climate change,” said Craig Jenkins, study co-author and emeritus professor of sociology at the ‘Ohio State University. “There is no ambiguity about this: Bangladesh did not cause the carbon problem, and yet it is already feeling the effects of climate change.”

The Floating Gardens of Bangladesh originated hundreds of years ago. The gardens are made from native plants that float in rivers – traditionally water hyacinths – and function almost like rafts, rising and falling with the waters. Historically, they were used to continue growing food during the rainy season when rivers filled with water.

Farmers – or their families – stack plants about three feet deep, creating a version of raised gardens that float in water. Then they plant vegetables inside these rafts. As raft plants decompose, they release nutrients that help nourish vegetable plants. These vegetable plants typically include okra, squash, spinach, and eggplant. Sometimes they also include spices like turmeric and ginger.

Floating gardens are also used in parts of Myanmar, Cambodia and India. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has designated Bangladesh’s Floating Gardens as an Agricultural Heritage System of Global Importance.

But as climate change has affected the volume of water in these rivers – creating extreme floods and floods, as well as extreme dips and droughts – floating gardens have become a way for rural farmers to continue producing food. food during unpredictable weather conditions. Climate change increases extreme weather conditions and the severity of floods, as well as droughts.

The researchers wanted to understand whether Bangladesh’s floating gardens could be a sustainable agricultural practice as climate change continued to cause floods and droughts, and to see if the gardens provided better food security for individual households.

“They need to be able to grow specific crops that can survive with minimal soil,” said Jenkins, who is also a research scientist and former director of the Ohio State Center for International Security Studies. “And in Bangladesh, many small farmers who used to depend on rice crops are moving away from it due to the effects of climate change and better yields from alternative crops.

For this study, the researchers interviewed farming families who use floating gardens and found strong evidence that floating gardens provide stability, both in the amount of food available to feed rural people and in the income of a farming family, despite the instability created by a changing climate. .

They found that farmers typically use hybrid seeds, which must be redeemed every year, to grow a diverse range of vegetables in the floating gardens. Gardens are also susceptible to pests, so farmers end up spending money on both pesticides and fertilizers. But even with these expenses, they found, the benefits outweighed the costs.

In general, entire families work on the gardens, the researchers found: Women, children and the elderly prepare seedlings and collect water plants to build gardens. The men cultivate the gardens and protect them from looters. Some families also raise fish in the waters around their floating gardens.

A farmer told the research team that he made up to four times more money from gardens than traditional rice paddies.

Still, the system could use improvements, the researchers found. Farmers often take out high-interest loans to cover the investment costs of building the beds and storing them in plants. They say low-interest loans from responsible governments or non-governmental organizations could ease this burden.

###

CONTACT:
Craig Jenkins,
jenkins.12@osu.edu

Written by Laura Arenschield,
arenschield.2@osu.edu

Warning: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of any press releases posted on EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information via the EurekAlert system.

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Seven players with Michigan ties win Super Bowl with Buccaneers https://fastpaths.com/seven-players-with-michigan-ties-win-super-bowl-with-buccaneers/ https://fastpaths.com/seven-players-with-michigan-ties-win-super-bowl-with-buccaneers/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:15:33 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/seven-players-with-michigan-ties-win-super-bowl-with-buccaneers/ Tom Brady did it again. The 43-year-old won his seventh Super Bowl on Sunday as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers beat the Kansas City Chiefs 31-9, but he wasn’t the only player with Michigan ties to win the top prize of the NFL. Seven players with Michigan ties were on the Tampa Bay active roster or […]]]>

Tom Brady did it again.

The 43-year-old won his seventh Super Bowl on Sunday as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers beat the Kansas City Chiefs 31-9, but he wasn’t the only player with Michigan ties to win the top prize of the NFL.

Seven players with Michigan ties were on the Tampa Bay active roster or practice squad, while the Chiefs also had 10 players with Michigan ties on their roster.

Here’s the full roster and how they fared in Sunday’s big game.

BUCCANEERS

Brady

University: Michigan

Brady received superb protection throughout the game and completed 21 of 29 passes for 209 yards and three touchdowns. He’s also been the benefactor of a handful of defensive penalty calls against the Chiefs, including one that canceled a first-half interception.

Receiver Antonio Brown

University: Central Michigan

The four-time All-Pro was questionable when he entered Sunday after missing the NFC Championship, but he managed and caught five passes for 22 yards and a touchdown. This is the first Super Bowl ring of the 2010 sixth round pick.

Defensive end William Gholston

University: Michigan State

The 2013 fourth-round pick was among the Buccaneers’ first seven who put pressure on Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes the entire game. Gholston didn’t have a tackle but did have a quarterback.

Cornerback Sean Murphy-Bunting

University: Central Michigan

The 2019 second-round pick continued his strong playoff series, finishing with six tackles and a broken pass on Sunday. Tampa Bay held Mahomes to 26 of 49 passes for 270 yards and two interceptions. Murphy-Bunting went to Clinton Township Chippewa Valley.

Defensive end Patrick O’Connor

University: Eastern Michigan

The Detroit Lions’ seventh-round pick in 2017 didn’t record any stats against the Chiefs. He had four tackles and one sack in the regular season.

Quarterback Drew Stanton

University: Michigan State

The 36-year-old served as a substitute on Sunday. He hasn’t played in an NFL game since 2017. This is his first Super Bowl title.

Gambler Matt Wile

University: Michigan

Wile is on the Tampa Bay practice team.

CHEFS

Running back Le’Veon Bell

University: State of Michigan

Bell was active on Sunday but did not appear in the game. He was doubtful to enter on Sunday with a knee injury.

Defensive end Frank Clark

University: Michigan

The Pro Bowler was the only Chiefs lineman to fire Brady on Sunday. He finished with four tackles, including two for loss, and a quarterback. Clark had three sacks in the playoffs after registering six in the regular season.

Defensive End Taco Charlton

University: Michigan

The 2017 Dallas Cowboys first-round pick is on the injured reserve and did not play on Sunday.

Defensive End Mike Danna

University: Michigan

Danna, a fifth-round rookie pick, landed a tackle against the Buccaneers. He attended high school at Warren De La Salle.

Defensive end Austin Edwards

University: Ferris State

Edwards is on the Kansas City training team

Eric Fisher offensive lineman

University: Central Michigan

The former No.1 overall pick and the Chiefs’ starting left tackle missed Sunday after suffering an injury to Achilles during the AFC championship. His absence was noticeable as the Kansas City offensive line battled the Tampa Bay pass rush. Fisher also frequented Rochester Hills Stoney Creek.

Quarterback Chad Henne

University: Michigan

The 35-year-old did not play on Sunday.

Tight End Nick Keizer

University: Grand Valley State

The former Portage Northern graduate did not record any statistics on Sunday.

Offensive lineman Patrick Omameh

University: Michigan

The 31-year-old did not play on Sunday.

Offensive lineman Andrew Wylie

University: Eastern Michigan

The former Midland High standout started for the Chiefs on Sunday.

RELATED: Wylie brings Hemlock farm mentality to Super Bowl 2021

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Woman, 27, charged with murder after shooting her boyfriend, 31, dead https://fastpaths.com/woman-27-charged-with-murder-after-shooting-her-boyfriend-31-dead/ https://fastpaths.com/woman-27-charged-with-murder-after-shooting-her-boyfriend-31-dead/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:15:33 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/woman-27-charged-with-murder-after-shooting-her-boyfriend-31-dead/ DETROIT – A 27-year-old woman faces a first degree murder charge for the shooting death of her 31-year-old boyfriend. The death of Willie Mills is Detroit’s first homicide in 2021. It happened less than two hours after the start of the new year. Kiantay Lovett-McCall is accused of shooting her boyfriend, Mills, repeatedly in the […]]]>

DETROIT – A 27-year-old woman faces a first degree murder charge for the shooting death of her 31-year-old boyfriend.

The death of Willie Mills is Detroit’s first homicide in 2021. It happened less than two hours after the start of the new year.

Kiantay Lovett-McCall is accused of shooting her boyfriend, Mills, repeatedly in the early morning hours of Friday January 1, when an argument escalated and she retrieved a gun and started shooting. shoot, according to a Wayne County District Attorney’s Office press release. Lovett-McCall had also been assaulted, Detroit News reports.

At 1:39 a.m. on Friday, Detroit Police officers were dispatched to a house shared by Lovett-McCall and Mills on the 18,000 block of Griggs Street, the statement said. When they arrived, the suspect was outside; the police quickly detained her. Inside the house, they found Mills lying on the floor with multiple gunshot wounds to his body. Doctors declared him dead at the scene.

Lovett-McCall was arraigned in Wayne County 34th District Court on Sunday January 3 for first degree murder and firearms. First degree murder is punishable by life imprisonment without parole. Lovett-McCall has received a $ 1 million bond. His preliminary examination was not scheduled.

READ MORE:

Woman found dead in the street with gunshot wounds

Radio personality Connie Kellie, fans, on-air partner heartbroken

Tuesday, January 5, coronavirus data by county: Amid weaker tests, positivity rates are on the rise

Man stabbed by girlfriend in Jackson County fight, police say

Ann Arbor, 19, charged with death of teenager from south of Lyon, second wanted suspect

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Toe injury excludes Pakistani Shadab Khan from South Africa tour https://fastpaths.com/toe-injury-excludes-pakistani-shadab-khan-from-south-africa-tour/ https://fastpaths.com/toe-injury-excludes-pakistani-shadab-khan-from-south-africa-tour/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:15:33 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/toe-injury-excludes-pakistani-shadab-khan-from-south-africa-tour/ The telegraph Sussex Royal loses its shine when the Duke and Duchess call in liquidators The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have officially liquidated one of their only remaining British companies, marking the last nail in the coffin of Sussex Royal. Documents filed with Companies House revealed that MWX Trading confirmed its liquidation on May […]]]>

The telegraph

Sussex Royal loses its shine when the Duke and Duchess call in liquidators

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have officially liquidated one of their only remaining British companies, marking the last nail in the coffin of Sussex Royal. Documents filed with Companies House revealed that MWX Trading confirmed its liquidation on May 5 and that a liquidator was appointed on May 14. The couple formed the company in August 2019, naming their attorney, Gerrard Tyrrell, as their secretary and Natalie Campbell, who worked for their Sussex Royal charitable foundation, as director. They registered it at Companies House and used the company to apply for trademarks. Ms Campbell and Mr Tyrrell were then replaced by James Holt, the couple’s former chief communications officer who was recently appointed executive director of their Archewell Foundation and is moving to the United States. The Duke and Duchess are also in the process of winding up the company formerly known as Sussex Royal, according to The Telegraph. When the couple announced they were stepping down from their roles as active royals, they were told they could no longer use the name and therefore changed it last July to become MWX Foundation. Despite reports suggesting that MWX represented Markle Windsor or Mountbatten Windsor, using the Sussex X, sources claimed the name was simply created from random letters and had no special meaning. Sussex Royal was announced with great fanfare in July 2019, shortly after it was confirmed that the Sussexes were breaking away from the Royal Foundation, the charity vehicle they had shared with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. Company accounts last year revealed it had £ 99,000 in the bank and would cost £ 16,000 to opt out. They also showed that the charity owed £ 200,000 to an unidentified source. Accounts of the MWX Foundation, of which the Duke remains sole trustee, show the £ 200,000 has now been repaid. The moves to formally liquidate the two companies come as the Sussexes continue to sign lucrative deals with business partners in the US through their new US-based Archewell Foundation, recently announcing a partnership with the consumer goods giant Proctor & Gamble.

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Dear Abby: Wife’s boyfriend worried about her previous relationship https://fastpaths.com/dear-abby-wifes-boyfriend-worried-about-her-previous-relationship/ https://fastpaths.com/dear-abby-wifes-boyfriend-worried-about-her-previous-relationship/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:15:33 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/dear-abby-wifes-boyfriend-worried-about-her-previous-relationship/ DEAR ABBY: My sister “Darby” and I are in our twenties and confused about the relationship she is in. She is 23 and is dating a 22-year-old man. They fight a lot because he keeps talking about his ex-boyfriend. He says he visualizes her having sex with him and that he is frustrated that he […]]]>

DEAR ABBY: My sister “Darby” and I are in our twenties and confused about the relationship she is in. She is 23 and is dating a 22-year-old man. They fight a lot because he keeps talking about his ex-boyfriend. He says he visualizes her having sex with him and that he is frustrated that he cannot get the images out of his head. Is there a name for this particular problem and how can Darby fix it? – SUPPORT SIS IN THE WEST

DEAR SIS: Yes, in fact, there are two names for this “condition”. These are obsession and jealousy, and both are signs of potential control issues. Stay close to your sister and be there for her, for this young man’s behavior is a wake-up call.

Darby and her boyfriend are both adults. I guess neither of the two came to the relationship wrapped in cellophane. Its fixation does not have to be his (or yours) to repair. Because he can’t get the images out of his head, he should schedule a few sessions with a licensed psychotherapist as his problem will continue for longer than he is in the dating world.

** ** **

DEAR ABBY: I moved in with my boyfriend six years ago. A year ago, her adult daughter decided that she would have all of her internet purchases sent to her home. Abby, these packages come in every day, all week. I am tired of it. I think she’s a fanatic.

I told him at the start of our relationship that I would never get between him and his daughter. But it has become a bit too much. She calls him for every little thing. Now she has started asking him to help her with her granddaughter’s homework. I have two grown children and grandchildren. Am I being overdone? I am ready to move. – ABOVE AND OUTSIDE

Expensive on top: Before you move out, discuss it with your six-year-old boyfriend. Her daughter appears to be unusually dependent on an adult. Is there a reason she does these things? Could she be afraid that the packages she ordered would be stolen from her porch? Does her daughter need more academic help than she can provide? The answers to these questions could be enlightening. Once you get these answers, you’ll have time to make a rational (rather than emotional) decision about the status of your relationship with her father.

** ** **

DEAR ABBY: I am a 52 year old single, straight man. For some reason only men seem to be drawn to me. If I sit at a table in a restaurant or bar, a man will come and sit next to me. If I go to the park, a man will sit next to me on the bench. While walking in the street, random men approach me. It is terrible. I’m straight! Please help! – PROBLEM UNIQUE IN CALIFORNIA

DEAR SINGLE PROBLEM: Because you don’t meet women, try to put yourself in situations where you will meet them. Because you are constantly approached by men and you are not interested, consider asking them if they have a single relative. And when you meet a woman that you think you can click, talk to, and introduce yourself to.

** ** **

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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Current Owner / Elliott Files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy and Reorganization – Supply Journal https://fastpaths.com/current-owner-elliott-files-for-chapter-11-bankruptcy-and-reorganization-supply-journal/ https://fastpaths.com/current-owner-elliott-files-for-chapter-11-bankruptcy-and-reorganization-supply-journal/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:15:33 +0000 https://fastpaths.com/current-owner-elliott-files-for-chapter-11-bankruptcy-and-reorganization-supply-journal/ The owner of contemporary celebrity-endorsed women’s brands, Current / Elliott and Joy asked bankruptcy and reorganization Monday night in a deal that would transfer ownership to senior lenders, two decades after its founding. Related Articles The Collected Group, owned by private equity group KKR, is seeking to eliminate $ 150 million in debt and withdraw […]]]>

The owner of contemporary celebrity-endorsed women’s brands, Current / Elliott and Joy asked bankruptcy and reorganization Monday night in a deal that would transfer ownership to senior lenders, two decades after its founding.

The Collected Group, owned by private equity group KKR, is seeking to eliminate $ 150 million in debt and withdraw around May 20, according to a Chapter 11 petition and reorganization plan submitted to a court of Delaware bankruptcy. The proposed restructuring, backed by lenders, would not only reduce the lifestyle company’s annual interest expense, but also arm it with exit funding of $ 30 million. If approved by the court, some existing receivables would be converted to loans under an exit facility, the documents said.

Joie, The Collected’s biggest brand, generated about 55% of net sales last year, Evan Hengel, director of restructuring and chief executive of the Berkeley Research Group, said in a statement. “At the height of the retail strategy pursued by the previous management, Joie operated approximately 24 physical outlets,” he added.

Founded in 1976 and relaunched by The Collected in 2010, Equipment generated around 35% of 2020 net sales, while Current / Elliott, inventor of “Boyfriend Jeans,” accounted for 11 percent of net sales.

The Collected operated 33 stores before the pandemic, but had closed those locations to focus on e-commerce – which fueled half of net sales last year – its 305 wholesale doors in the United States and 272 wholesale accounts international. The pandemic-related disruptions reduced retail revenues by 85%, while wholesale revenues fell by almost 70%.

Hengel said The Collected completed an out-of-court restructuring in 2018 and subsequently hired an investment banker to arrange a sale in late 2019 and early 2020. While 37 parties signed no-go deals disclosure and were given access to a “data room.” Interest dried up in March of last year as potential buyers lowered their proposed purchase prices or walked away until there was more of clarity on post-pandemic business terms, Hengel said in the court filing.

The Collected also encountered supply chain issues that hampered their access to inventory, Hengel said. “Inventory scarcity issues were also motivated by the strategic decision to cancel some fashion development seasons. [in fourth quarter] 2020 to mitigate the rise in Covid-19 cases and the associated uncertainty regarding the clothing purchasing habits of customers until the effects of the pandemic wear off, ”he added.

At the time of its bankruptcy filing, The Collected had approximately $ 185.3 million in funded debt outstanding, excluding interest and accrued charges, plus approximately $ 35.5 million in unsecured bonds, which include overdue rents and possible damage claims from the time he dismissed his petition in Chapter 11.

The top 10 unsecured creditors include six owners and four trade receivables. Dayu Garments Co. Ltd. in Hong Kong owes $ 1.4 million, while Jointex Garment Manufactory Ltd, also in Hong Kong, owes $ 1.3 million. High Fashion Garments in Hong Kong owes $ 903,415, while China Ting Fashion Group (USA) LLC in New York has a claim in the amount of $ 748,000. Among the owners, the top three on the list of unsecured creditors are: RXR SL Owner LLC, New York, NY, $ 2.5 million; 421W14 Lessee LP, Boston, Massachusetts, $ 2.0 million, and Century City Mall LLC, Los Angeles, California, $ 1.9 million.

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